Invite to Invest

Solar Development

Iran’s Sixth Development Plan also provided for the installation of 500 MW of new solar capacity by 2018. Iran’s climate is diverse, and many of its regions are arid. Because the south, northwest and southeast regions receive around 300 days of sun per year, they are uniquely suited for solar energy. The Iranian government has prioritized the central region in particular due to its climate and proximity to the national power grid. A series of deals with an unnamed German company to add around 550 MW of solar to the power grid were reportedly signed in August 2014 and are currently in development.
While Iranian policies for wind power are more aggressive in the short-term, plans for solar capacity are ambitious in the long-term. For instance, Iranian power developer Sunir and a Spanish company called Bester recently revealed plans to significantly expand Iran’s solar potential by 2020. An additional 1,000 MW of solar capacity has been proposed by a consortium of Iranian, Indian and South Korean companies as part of a 10,000 MW “energy park” in the southwest, oil-rich Iranian province of Khuzestan.
The heavy involvement of foreign partners in solar projects is practical, as well as economical. A lack of access to key solar technologies like inverters for voltage control and appropriately advanced semiconductors has presented logistical challenges to domestic Iranian companies. With the recent removal of sanctions, Iranian companies now have greater access to a wider range of increasingly sophisticated solar technologies and financing to purchase and develop them. The immediate benefits will be their rapid installation and, in the long-term, the country is likely to benefit from gaining the ability to produce a significant amount of its solar infrastructure domestically.

Iran’s Wind Power Potential

With 100,000 MW of potential installed capacity, Iran’s wind power potential could rival that of major wind developing countries such as France and Britain. Unsurprisingly, the Iranian government has given wind power priority over other R.E. sources due to the country’s topography and existing manufacturing and production capabilities. 
A 5,000 MW increase of energy capacity due to new R.E. is anticipated by 2018. Roughly 4,500 MW of that capacity is expected to come from utility-scale wind farms throughout the country. Due to its strategic location along several major wind corridors, including Atlantic, Mediterranean and Indian Ocean currents, Iran’s northwest and northeast experience high winds year-round.

Iran’s Wind Power Potential

Source: Iran National Environmental Fund

The relative consistency of these wind currents allows for sustainable access to wind energy that will significantly reduce the need for committing peak power thermal generators to daily power generation.
Iran is well-positioned to rapidly scale up its wind power sector. The country already operates 15 wind farms, and the vast majority of the components used to develop those farms were produced locally. Due to the impact of Western sanctions, the country has made use of its abundant human capital to develop technological capabilities in turbine, generator, and inverter production, and has even considered exporting this equipment to Azerbaijan and India.
Also working in Iran’s favor is its workforce: around 60 percent of Iranians are under the age of 30 and are comparatively well-educated. According to data published in the World Economic Forum’s 2015 Human Capital Index and synthesized by Forbes, Iran graduates more engineers than any other country surveyed except Russia and the United States. These benefits, coupled with a 20-year-long Iranian government power purchase guarantee, have already had the effect of occasioning significant interest among foreign firms. In September 2015, for instance, German-Iranian joint venture GI Umwelt consult reached an agreement with the Iranian government to construct a 48-megawatt wind farm in the southwest Iranian province of Khuzestan valued at $46 million. Following a January 2016 visit to Iran by a Danish political and business delegation, Iranian Minister of Energy Hamid Chitchian also announced that Denmark would construct a wind turbine facility in Iran.

Share

Invite to Invest

Iran’s Sixth Development Plan also provided for the installation of 500 MW of new solar capacity by 2018. Iran’s climate is diverse, and many of its regions are arid. Because the south, northwest and southeast regions receive around 300 days of sun per year, they are uniquely suited for solar energy. The Iranian government has prioritized the central region in particular due to its climate and proximity to the national power grid.

SEE MORE

Last Blog

With 10+ years of experience, a reliable team of more than 30 engineers and architects, more than 1GW in projects designed and engineered, 2 international offices, head offices in Italy and an O&M division, BFP is your reliable, qualified partner of choice for all your engineering and consulting needs, worldwide.

ARCHIVE

  • The Renewable Energy Market of Iran

    The Renewable Energy Market of Iran

    Written on Monday, 09 January 2017 16:47
    The Market Iran’s potential for renewable energy is vast, possessing some of the best combined wind and solar resources in…
  • How Solar Panels Work

    How Solar Panels Work

    Written on Tuesday, 26 July 2016 12:12
    Solar Panel cells convert sunlight into electricity by an energy conversion process. In most Solar Panel cells, photons (light energy)…

Contact us

Tel: +982188548096
Fax: +982188548095
Email: info@ipg-co.com
Tehran Office
Address: #11, Savojinia Street, Pakistan Street, Beheshti Street, Tehran, IR